Start Watfordobserver co uk dating

Watfordobserver co uk dating

The settlement's location helped it to grow, since as well as trade along this north-south through route it possessed good communications into the vale of St Albans to the east and into the Chiltern Hills along the valley of the River Chess to the west.

Watford remained an agricultural community with some cottage industry for many centuries.

The Industrial Revolution brought the Grand Junction Canal (now Grand Union Canal) from 1798 and the London and Birmingham Railway from 1837, both located here for the same reasons the road had followed centuries before, seeking an easy gradient over the Chiltern Hills.

The land-owning interests permitted the canal to follow closely by the river Gade, but the prospect of smoke-emitting steam trains drove them to ensure the railway gave a wide berth to the Cassiobury and Grove estates.

Consequently, although the road and canal follow the easier valley route, the railway company was forced to build an expensive tunnel under Leavesden to the north of the town.

at nearby Croxley, influencing the development of printing in the town.

Two brewers, Benskins and Sedgwicks, amalgamated and flourished in the town until their closure in the late 20th century.

Watford's original railway station opened in 1837 on the west side of St Albans Road, a small, single-storey red-brick building.

It closed in 1858 when it was replaced by a new, larger station at Watford Junction approximately 200 metres (220 yd) further south-east.

The town grew partly due to travellers going to Berkhamsted Castle and the royal palace at Kings Langley.

A mansion was built at Cassiobury in the 16th century.

The old station house still stands today; it is a Grade-II-listed building and is now occupied by a second-hand car dealership.